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Article:
  Homemade Dot-Mac with OS X, Part 2
Subject:   The missing Airport / network link
Date:   2002-10-10 15:38:19
From:   anonymous2
Sorry that I'm posting it here, but this is the most recent article in the series...


I have a local set up with a Powerbook with Airport connection and a G3 B&W with ethernet to the Airport base.
I've got the dynamic DNS and got Airpost to point to the G3, who is the web server now, but I run in to the local vs. internet problem.
First it all seemed to work fine locally, but people couldn't look at my site. It turned out the IP update software sent the internal IP-address of my machine in the network as the IP for the site. So locally I could see things fine, as it pointed to my machine locally, but others also tried to get to the local IP, which of course doesn't work from outside...
Then I solved that, by getting the correct IP for the dyndns.org connection, but now others could see my pages, but I couldn't get to my site using the domain name. I've installed some bulletin board scripts to test, but some use full URL's for the links instead of relative links. This means I can't navigate through them, and thus not test them while on my local network. Neither computer understands how to get to the web server through the domain name.


I've added the domain name to 'machines' with Netinfo-manager, but it seems that the computer still thinks that the domain can be reached only through the 'external' IP address, which means it can't find the site.


Can somebody please tell me THE working solution to get the domain to be reachable locally? Similar to altering a hosts file on a system V UNIX...?


Those are my 'complaints' about these articles; the pass the 'big issues' whem doing this setup on multiple machines:
- how do I get Airport to point to the machine chosen to be webserver. This was avoided in the article by having the 'webserver' being connected directly to the internet instead of through Airport,
- how do I get all machines to resolve the domain name to a local IP, since the public IP doesn't work.