All PDA Movie Attracts Interest

by Derrick Story

Sometimes it's just a matter of wondering, "Can that be done?" I wanted to know if I could make a synchronized audio/video movie with just a Handspring Visor. The answer is, "yes!"



I have a QuickTime column on oreillynet.com's Mac DevCenter. When thinking about possible subjects to write about, I look for areas where different technologies overlap to create a new way of doing things. Sometimes this is referred to as convergence.



One trend that I had been following was using PDAs to create digital pictures -- specifically the EyeModule2 for the Handspring Visor. I managed to wrangle a Visor Prism and an EM2 out of Handspring's PR agency, and started playing with them to see how far I could push the envelope.



As I studied it, I realized that it could record QuickTime video also. So I thought to myself, "What if I shot a movie that has both audio and video, using nothing more than a Visor Prism and two Springboard modules" (EM2 and Targus digital voice recorder)?



So, I got a chimney glass from the kitchen, filled it with ice, and grabbed a bottle of Bubble-Up. I set up the Visor and recorded my pouring the Bubble-Up into the glass of ice. Hence the title of the movie, Bubbles.



I then synchronized the audio and video in QuickTime Pro, and published the movie as one of the examples for my article. I don't know of any other movies with synchronized sound and video using only a PDA.



After I published the column and the movie, I got lots of feedback. But things got really interesting when Jennifer from Developer Relations of Handspring, Inc. phoned me saying that her boss, the Director of Dev Rel. was a big fan of the movie and wanted to know if they could have the original, uncompressed version to show at their upcoming Developer Forum.



As far as I know, the movie went over well at the Developer Forum because there have been requests for the link to download it. But I haven't heard back directly from Handspring.



One last note ... my favorite reader response to the article and the movie began like this: "Boy, you sure must have a lot of time on your hands."