Does JavaFX Spell The End Of AJAX?

by Krishna Srinivasan

"Internetnews is reporting on Sun's introduction of JavaFX at JavaOne today. Looks like a combination Applet, Flash, Javascript, and AJAX with a friendly programming interface. Does this really spell the end of AJAX? I sincerely hope so. Nothing built on Javascript will ever achieve the security, cross-platform reliability, and programmatic friendliness that Web 2.0 needs. Proprietary solutions and vendor lock-in are also dead ends. JavaFX has the potential to satisfy this opportunity even better than did Java over a decade ago. Along with AJAX, let's hope JavaFX also puts paid to Microsoft's viral Active-X and JScript, and, more importantly, that it really is a web scripting language that developers can grok."
http://www.internetnews.com/dev-news/article.php/3676226
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12 Comments

Terry Laurenzo
2007-05-09 02:04:29
Agreed that ajax technologies are less than optimal, but I wouldn't start drinking the kool-aid on this one quite yet. Aside from Sun's less than stellar track record in this space, both Adobe and Microsoft are shipping solutions today (Silverlight itself isn't shipping but WPF/XAML/.NET3 that it is built on debuted with vista).
Laurent Szyster
2007-05-09 04:55:36
"Nothing built on Javascript will ever achieve the security, cross-platform reliability, and programmatic friendliness that Web 2.0 needs."


Coming from the former promoters of Java applets, this statement is the best argument *against* JavaFX.


"Proprietary solutions and vendor lock-in are also dead ends."


I could not agree more, but then I have to conclude that J2EE, WS-* and those tons of JSR *proprietary* specifications from Sun are all dead-ends?


"JavaFX has the potential to satisfy this opportunity even better than did Java over a decade ago."


Would that be an achievement?


Sorry guys, but I still prefer a bird in my hand than two in the bushes ...

Ryan
2007-05-09 06:10:04
"Nothing built on Javascript will ever achieve the security, cross-platform reliability, and programmatic friendliness that Web 2.0 needs."


What are you using to build web 2.0 applications? are you living in the stone age? Tools like Ruby on Rails and Wicket (even GWT) make building Web 2.0 applications that rely heavily on javascript a snap. A *hell* of a lot better than that JSF crap.


Security? Give me a break. This is the biggest FUD statement about ajax and javascript applications. Do some real research before throwing out a statement like that.

Rupert
2007-05-09 06:42:06
Ryan,


Who said anything about JSF?


As for security, current AJAX/Web apps are only as secure as your current browser and it's Javascript engine. It's a no-brainer that applications running in a Java VM are more secure and a hell of a lot faster than your Firefox/IE equivalent. The Browser as a fat(okay, chubby) client SUCKS. The sooner that whole development paradigm dies, the better.


That being said, Sun has a lot of catching up to do, as usual.

J. Keplinger
2007-05-09 06:44:35
This is ripped verbatim from Slashdot. Way to cite your sources, Krishna. Is this what passes for tech blogs now?
Bob
2007-05-09 07:03:48
Yeah, that's why it's enclosed in quotes and has a link at the bottom, genius.
Tim O'Brien
2007-05-09 07:08:32
No it doesn't. Part of the presentation yesterday was an application named IRIS which heavily relied on Javascript and they used JavaFX to augment the featureset. Whoever wrote that Slashdot article doesn't really have insight into JavaFX
Mike
2007-05-09 14:03:33
Well, I've run all the JavaFX demos now, and every one of them were accompanied by the "How do you want to open something.jnlp", then the infamous "The applications digital signature cannot be verified. Do you want to run the application"
Answer...NO!!!
I notice that the Indiana Jones(ish) "Temple of the Sun" game was done in Flash, not exactly eating their own dog food.
I really had high hopes too.
Rob Di Marco
2007-05-09 16:14:03
JavaFX looks to me to be a marketing effort to combat the Silverlight announcement this month from Microsoft. It looks to just be a rebranding of the F3 project. While it may help with some coding complexity associated with Java WebStart/Java Swing, the platform itself has been generally rejected from the marketplace. I don't see JavaFX every gaining any real traction; certainly not enough to displace AJAX.


JavaFX is not the end of AJAX, but Adobe Flex and MS Silverlight might.

Xaymaca
2007-05-10 10:49:31
End of AJAX? I think not, though I also wish it were so. Java lives in interesting times my friend.
Carl Gundel
2007-05-12 13:01:17
While we may need something better than AJAX, Sun's approach of trying to solve this problem by tying it to Java is going to be its weak link. AJAX is programming language neutral, and this is an important feature. JavaFX will only be a solution for Java shops.


AJAX has the mindshare and momentum at this time, and JavaFX will not be able to overtake it, I predict.

Adrian Kiess
2007-05-13 10:28:06
JavaFX. This name simply sucks. No chance I'd say.