Take a Look at Apache Jackrabbit

by Tim O'Brien

Jackrabbit is a content repository from the Apache Software Foundation. It only graduated from the Apache Incubator recently, and there is a 1.0 release available. I'm impressed with what I've seen so far, but one note of caution is that the documentation (Javadoc) on the site is for the trunk release not the 1.0 release. There are some things you'll probably want to investigate, like setting up persitence managers that retrieve a DataSource from JNDI. If you download the 1.0 distribution and attempt to use something like JNDIDatabasePersistenceManager you are going to have problems.



To get around this, you can checkout the Jackrabbit source from Subversion and build it using Maven 1.0.2.
If you check out the source, you'll also want to check out the code in a contrib subproject jcr-commands. If you are looking for good code documentation, you'll find it in this commandline tool.



I've been taking a closer look at JSR-170 lately, mainly because Content Management Systems are probably the single most abused product category in enterprise computing. The industry hasn't converged on a single definition of what a Content Management System does and does not do, and I see JSR-170 as an attempt to provide some clarity and concepts to what I perceive as the current "Wild West" approach to selecting a CMS. When organziations select a CMS, they are usually selecting the product with the prettiest looking interface, JSR-170 is an attempt to put some badly needed standards and stability behind those pretty content management toolls. From what I've seen in JSR-170, I'm interested to see what the next revision of JCR will bring. Work has already begun on JSR-283


8 Comments

David Dossot
2006-04-20 00:27:29
An interesting fact is the dual language some of the CMS vendor tend to adopt with the advent of JCR: "use JCR so you use us risk free" but "prefer using our API as much as possible as our JCR implementation is not as good". Old habits die hard: once you have tasted good old lock-in, it is hard to fully embrace a vendor neutral approach.


This said, it is pretty heartening to notice how the expert group has widened between JSR-170 and 283: vendors start to take JCR seriously (or they all conspire to make it fail ;-).

Anonymous
2006-04-26 14:01:16
There are some interesting questions/doubts about JCR 1.0 discussed here and there:


- http://jroller.com/page/mpermar?entry=playing_with_jcr_and_jeceira
- http://ddossot.blogspot.com/2006/04/subtle-glitch-in-jcr-10.html

Tim O'Brien
2006-04-26 14:40:46
re: Anonymous, sure you could either see this as a "subtle glitch", or a positive of JCR-170 - I see the flexibility as a positive at the moment, and part of the problem of an individual vendor's CS implementation is that they tie you into a specific definition of what a folder is or what a file is.


I'm sure that over time and with JSR-283, conventions might emerge that help people tandardize toward a standard set of properties. In fact, the namespaces facility would be a perfect place to start something like this. I'd like to see an independent orgnization create a standard namespace for a specific type of content.

Jukka Zitting
2006-05-30 00:14:43
BTW, we've recently changed the Javadocs on the Apache Jackrabbit web site to reflect the 1.0 release instead of the svn trunk.


There is also a 1.0.1 release coming up with a number of fixes and improvements. Look for the official announcement in a few days.

jame lee curtis
2006-09-01 11:41:32
jame lee curtis
puritan D%C3%BCsseldorf
2006-10-13 06:23:09
Jackrabbit is a content repository from the Apache Software Foundation. It only graduated from the Apache Incubator recently, and there is a 1.0 release available. I’m impressed with what I’ve seen so far, but one note of caution is that the documentation (Javadoc) on the site is for the trunk release not the 1.0 release. There are some things you’ll probably want to investigate, like setting up persitence managers that retrieve a DataSource from JNDI. If you download the 1.0 distribution and attempt to use something like JNDIDatabasePersistenceManager you are going to have problems.
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Newcastle upon Tyne Jobs
2007-03-21 04:39:12
Jackrabbit is a content repository from the Apache Software Foundation. It only graduated from the Apache Incubator recently, and there is a 1.0 release available. I’m impressed with what I’ve seen so far, but one note of caution is that the documentation (Javadoc) on the site is for the trunk release not the 1.0 release. There are some things you’ll probably want to investigate, like setting up persitence managers that retrieve a DataSource from JNDI. If you download the 1.0 distribution and attempt to use something like JNDIDatabasePersistenceManager you are going to have problems.
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ongoing Munich
2007-04-05 00:40:19
Jackrabbit is a content repository from the Apache Software Foundation. It only graduated from the Apache Incubator recently, and there is a 1.0 release available. I’m impressed with what I’ve seen so far, but one note of caution is that the documentation (Javadoc) on the site is for the trunk release not the 1.0 release. There are some things you’ll probably want to investigate, like setting up persitence managers that retrieve a DataSource from JNDI. If you download the 1.0 distribution and attempt to use something like JNDIDatabasePersistenceManager you are going to have problems.
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