MacWorld Shoot, Day 5

by James Duncan Davidson

After wrapping up my last day of shooting at MacWorld on Friday, it was time to sit down and sift through photographs. And, boy, there were quite a few to go through. I shot 943 frames for my assignment. During the first cut, I flat out rejected 290 as unusable for any purpose and left 478 unrated. The unrated images are the ones that won't make it to the client for this assignment, but which might have other uses at some point in the future. Or maybe they won't. But they won't get unceremoniously erased off the hard drive at this point like the rejects will. On the other hand, 175 images got one star or better, which means that there's a possibility of them being used.

The next step that I usually take after the first cut is a second detailed pass. It's on this pass that I do critical examination of photographs to rank them against each other. It's at this point that I'll start figuring out what some of the best images of the shoot are, especially for the immediate purpose of fulfilling my assignment. It's at this point that my photographs will end up with their final star ranking for a while.

5 Comments

Bernt
2007-01-15 07:35:30
Hello Duncan,
if you look for portable performance, why don't you have a closer look at the LaCie Little big Disk? 160 GB and more, FireWire 800 and stripped RAID, some running with 7200. As I always had the feeling the images don't want to get in or out of my drive in my MBP 17, (same as you have) and I'm so fed up to see the spinning wheel... Will get the 200 GBs in the next days...


Cheers

KG
2007-01-15 12:12:46
Nice work, JDD (do you prefer James or Duncan or other?). Thanks once again for sharing your insights. I'd love for more photographers to do this. You have me thinking I should blog one of my shoots. Although, I'm not the writer you are, that's for sure. And, my shoots aren't nearly as exciting as MacWorld Expo. LOL Still, I may give it a shot. Anyway, I'm looking forward to the last post of this series.


paul
2007-01-15 19:26:03
When you said you exported the images to Photoshop, do you really mean "export", or did you use the edit in external editor command? Just wondering, as I'm trying to figure out the best workflow in this area as well.
Micah
2007-01-15 20:45:12
Paul,
Just thought I would chime in here... When you hit Edit in External Editor in Aperture (assuming you have PS set as your editor) Aperture makes a new file from the version you have selected. It then opens that new file in PShop. The file itself (can be either a PSD or TIFF) is stored in the Managed library in Aperture, unless you move it using the Relocate Masters function.


It would essentialy be the same as exporting a PSD and then opening that file in PShop, but this way, Aperture manages the file in its database. I think this is a critical thing to understand about the Aperture way of doing things. You can take full advantage of the Aperture RAW converter, make any crops, edits, and add metadata, and THEN send it to PShop, very easily. Once you hit save in PShop, and close the file, you can go back in Aperture and see the thumbnail update with your PShop edits.

James Duncan Davidson
2007-01-15 23:20:31
Bernt: Interesting find there with the LaCie drives you mentioned. I hadn't seen that one before and it looks like a possibly good solution. I'm curious to hear how it works.


KG: You're welcome! As far as the name goes, either one. Duncan works James works. :) But, most of my friends call me Duncan these days. You should definitly try blogging a shoot. It's a good experience that makes you very aware of the things you do. I'm looking forward to finding a few hours later this week to wrap this series up.


Paul: In this case, I meant "export the files out from Aperture to a folder on my Desktop and use them from there". I probably should be doing what Micah says, but for some reason when I switch into "compositing" mode, I pull from my library and just work with the files as is.


Micah: Thanks for chiming in. :) And you're right. This would be a good way to keep the cropped and modified versions in my main library instead of having them managed out in my Subversion tree with the HTML and the other files I have pulled together for the website.