What if Microsoft Became Our Friends

by Carla Schroder

Related link: http://lxer.com/module/newswire/view/47917/index.html



What would happen to Linux, Free Software, and Open Source Software if Microsoft reformed itself? What if Microsoft abandoned their evil, customer-hostile, restraint-of-trade ways, and did a complete turnaround? Would FOSS even have a reason to exist?

4 Comments

daeley
2005-11-17 19:55:30
Well...
If the only reason for the existence of the free and open source software movement was making Microsoft act nicer, then perhaps. Despite the propaganda by both/all sides, Microsoft is only the worst example among many closed-source companies who 'innovate' by acquisition, intimidation, and litigation -- acting nicer isn't the point.


What's more, Microsoft itself isn't the point. Providing the best possible software is.

andrewburton
2005-11-17 21:29:13
The heck?
That's kind of like asking, "If Adobe started handing out free copies of Photoshop, would pencils and paint cease to be?" The answer is a resounding no. FOSS, Windows, Apple, etc. all exist because genetics has proven diversity is the best way for something to survive.
linuxtampa
2005-11-18 05:52:41
That's a laugh!
That's a bet I'll take... Microsoft is not going to become our (or anyone else's) friend until Bill Gates (the world's most famous dropout) goes back to kindergarten and learns how to share!


It's kind of a saying what if
Tonya Harding became Nancy Kerrigan's friend. (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=tonya+harding+attack&btnG=Google+Search)



There are HUNDREDS of fronts on which Microsoft (and MANY others) would have to do an about-face on in order to even come close! Not just on prices, or security track record, or overall stability/quality - but they would have to get a clue in patents, interoperability, humane design, testing, etc.


I think you're wasting your time wondering what a nice "Bill and Balmer" team would be like, because we're never going to see one. Period.

Craig
2006-04-12 08:42:39
Well, it sure would be interesting IF such a thing were to happen. However, FOSS would still exist. I agree with all the posted comments thus far. Providing the best software is what ultimately drives the industry. Unfortunately, in the view of many, whether they are correct or not (and I am of the opinion they are correct), the prices they charge for licensing the software is way too high for even many SMBs to digest. This is the true potential of FOSS. FOSS is making great strides in business and at home, but it has a long way to go.